International tender for the design of TNTO stands, for more information please click here.International tender for the design of TNTO stands, for more information please click here.International tender for the design of TNTO stands, for more information please click here.International tender for the design of TNTO stands, for more information please click here.

Hammamet & Cap Bon

This canon-shaped headland in the north-eastern tip of Tunisia, juts out into the Mediterranean, flanked the Gulf of Tunis to the west and the Gulf of Hammamet to the east. Home to Tunisia’s most popular resorts, Cap Bon is often referred to as the ‘Garden of Tunisia’ on account of its flourishing palms, eucalyptus trees and abundant sweet-smelling flora.

Important relics and magnificent historical sites draw visitors from all over the globe to the ruins of ancient civilisations at Carthage and Kerkouane. At Hammamet, large-scale development has equipped the town well for its role as the nation’s ‘Tourism Capital’ with dozens of upscale hotels strung along a ritzy beach-trimmed shore.

Once a humble fishing settlement set amongst lemon groves, Hammamet has undergone a metamorphic transformation in the last century. Yet away from the parasol scattered sands a stroll around the historic centre provides a glimpse into Hammamet’s bygone era with its charming medina, thick stone Kasbah and riddle of narrow alleyways.

On the lesser-known west coast, the bubbling underwater springs of Korbous, on the craggy slopes of Jebel Korbous, gush into the sea. Famous since Roman times as Aquae Calidau Carpitanae, and heavily developed by the French, Korbous remains popular with weekending Tunisians seeking curative respite from the mineral-rich thermal waters and hot muds.

Nabeul, located on the southern underbelly of the land-spit, is an affordable alternative to 5-star razzle-dazzle of Hammamet. Renowned for its fine ceramics and busy Friday market, Nabeul has a captivating charm with its basketry, bric-a-brac and embroidery stalls, camel rides and ramshackle medina.

At the tip of the peninsula, the pretty town of El Haouaria is famous for its ancient falconry tradition: a venerated art honoured each year during a week-long falconry festival. As migratory birds, peregrine falcons and sparrow hawks are caught each year during their passage through the region and then trained to hunt. Large numbers of falconry devotees visit El Haouaria in order to practise the art. A highly informative falconry centre, 1km from the middle of town, contains lots of information on the nature of Cap Bon’s rich hinterland.

South along the coast, Kerkouane has the largest Carthaginian site yet uncovered in a remarkable state of preservation. Nearby, the backwater fishing port of Kélibia is home to a picturesque natural harbour and some rustic stretches of perfect sand.

HAMMAMET & CAP BON PENINSULA

This canon-shaped headland in the north-eastern tip of Tunisia, juts out into the Mediterranean, flanked the Gulf of Tunis to the west and the Gulf of Hammamet to the east. Home to Tunisia’s most popular resorts, Cap Bon is often referred to as the ‘Garden of Tunisia’ on account of its flourishing palms, eucalyptus trees and abundant sweet-smelling flora.

Important relics and magnificent historical sites draw visitors from all over the globe to the ruins of ancient civilisations at Carthage and Kerkouane. At Hammamet, large-scale development has equipped the town well for its role as the nation’s ‘Tourism Capital’ with dozens of upscale hotels strung along a ritzy beach-trimmed shore. Once a humble fishing settlement set amongst lemon groves, Hammamet has undergone a metamorphic transformation in the last century. Yet away from the parasol scattered sands a stroll around the historic centre provides a glimpse into Hammamet’s bygone era with its charming medina, thick stone Kasbah and riddle of narrow alleyways. On the lesser-known west coast, the bubbling underwater springs of Korbous, on the craggy slopes of Jebel Korbous, gush into the sea. Famous since Roman times as Aquae Calidau Carpitanae, and heavily developed by the French, Korbous remains popular with weekending Tunisians seeking curative respite from the mineral-rich thermal waters and hot muds. Nabeul, located on the southern underbelly of the land-spit, is an affordable alternative to 5-star razzle-dazzle of Hammamet. Renowned for its fine ceramics and busy Friday market, Nabeul has a captivating charm with its basketry, bric-a-brac and embroidery stalls, camel rides and ramshackle medina. At the tip of the peninsula, the pretty town of El Haouaria is famous for its ancient falconry tradition: a venerated art honoured each year during a week-long falconry festival. As migratory birds, peregrine falcons and sparrow hawks are caught each year during their passage through the region and then trained to hunt. Large numbers of falconry devotees visit El Haouaria in order to practise the art. A highly informative falconry centre, 1km from the middle of town, contains lots of information on the nature of Cap Bon’s rich hinterland. South along the coast, Kerkouane has the largest Carthaginian site yet uncovered in a remarkable state of preservation. Nearby, the backwater fishing port of Kélibia is home to a picturesque natural harbour and some rustic stretches of perfect sand.